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The fluffy Spunky sheep on an oval 5.5" x 3.5" bumper sticker.

All of the money for these, every penny of both dollars. will be donated to the National 4-H Council to help fund their continuing work with youth development. They have received Charity Navigator's highest rating of four stars. They just do wonderful things and we are proud to support them.
Hiya Hiya makes a fabulous aluminum crochet hook that fits well in the hand and quickly warms up. They're lightweight and they come in a great range of assorted colors. (please note that colors may vary from what you see here)
Hiya Hiya makes a great chunky lightweight plastic crochet hook that fits well in the hand. They're lightweight and they come in bright colors. (please note that colors may vary from what you see here)
Hiya Hiya makes this great 5" fine gauge crochet hook. It's nickel plated and is just a gorgeous little instrument. Hooks this fine are perfect for super fine work or adding beads to knitting.
Bobbin Bearing The Spunky Eclectic Sheep Logo as a 1 inch Pendant in Bamboo.

Choose round or cutout.
Fibre Rinse Fibre Wash
Fibre Rinse
Our Price: $3.25
Fibre Wash
Our Price: $4.00
Designed to optimize conditioning of the natural fiber cuticle and enhance the softness of delicate synthetic items, Unicorn Fibre Rinse was formulated to enhance the benefits of Fibre Wash and Power Scour. Designed to optimize conditioning of the natural fiber cuticle and enhance the softness of delicate synthetic items, Unicorn Fibre Rinse was formulated to enhance the benefits of Fibre Wash and Power Scour. The gentle cleaning process, strong enough for rough and tumble knitwear, yet so very gentle on the most delicate fine yarns and hand knit creations..
Power Scour
Power Scour
Our Price: $4.75
The Spunky Eclectic Sheep Logo as a 1 inch Pin in Bamboo.

Choose round or cutout.
This is hands down the most effective stuff to clean your fleeces with. These cables are soft and supple. Perfect for magic loop or just comfortable knitting.

Large cable width fits needle sizes US 9 (5.5mm) and larger
Small Cable width fits needle sizes US 8 (5mm) and smaller.

The 2 lengths listed are for the different tip sizes. If you are using the 4 inch tips, go by the smaller length and if you're using the 5 inch use the larger length listed
Hiya Hiya Bamboo Double Pointed Needles
Travel friendly (ok with US TSA) and the perfect little size to fit into your notions pouch. Not to mention they're just cute.



Birch cutout in cute ornament shapes just waiting for your special yarn to weave through and make a beautiful ornament. Certainly perfect for the holidays but I can see this with bright summer yarns to display year round.

Choose your shape.
Fabulous smooth finished Bamboo double points. Perfect for all your projects that you prefer double points for. These are some of my favorite sock needles.



Hiya Hiya Circular Bamboo Needles Hiya Hiya Circular Bamboo Needles
Earthenware ornament cut into a shape and then hand painted with sheep, goat, or bunny.
These were rolled and then cut out. Please choose your favorite design.

They come with a little gold string to hang them.
These are my personal favorite needles to knit with. Smooth bamboo tips with a well made join that won't snag your yarn no matter how fine it is. The plastic circular part is flexible enough to make magic loop a breeze. It's not stiff at all.



These are my personal favorite needles to knit with. Smooth bamboo tips with a well made join that won't snag your yarn no matter how fine it is. The plastic circular part is flexible enough to make magic loop a breeze. It's not stiff at all.



Hiya Hiya Circular Bamboo Needles Hiya Hiya Circular Bamboo Needles Hiya Hiya Circular Bamboo Needles
These are my personal favorite needles to knit with. Smooth bamboo tips with a well made join that won't snag your yarn no matter how fine it is. The plastic circular part is flexible enough to make magic loop a breeze. It's not stiff at all.



These are my personal favorite needles to knit with. Smooth bamboo tips with a well made join that won't snag your yarn no matter how fine it is. The plastic circular part is flexible enough to make magic loop a breeze. It's not stiff at all.



These are my personal favorite needles to knit with. Smooth bamboo tips with a well made join that won't snag your yarn no matter how fine it is. The plastic circular part is flexible enough to make magic loop a breeze. It's not stiff at all.



Hiya Hiya Circular Bamboo Needles
These are my personal favorite needles to knit with. Smooth bamboo tips with a well made join that won't snag your yarn no matter how fine it is. The plastic circular part is flexible enough to make magic loop a breeze. It's not stiff at all.



Log cabin, shadow weave, and other striking color-and-weave patterns using both 4 and 8-shafts are the focus of this issue. Featured projects include a doublewidth log cabin blanket, shimmering shadow weave shawls, and a warp rep rug with optical illusions woven in the pattern.

The September/October 2011 issue of Handwoven is dedicated to handwoven fashion. The winners of the Väv Garment Challenge are showcased in a beautiful photo gallery and instructions for weaving and sewing each stunning project are also included. Other projects include a scarf woven with threads that light up, a vest that combines knitting and weaving, and a lovely neck piece created on an inkle loom.

The Winter 2010 issue of Spin-Off magazine is so full of fiber that if you snuggled up next to it, it will keep you warm. Open the pages and you'll find (images of) angora, qiviut, alpaca, and sheep's wool tucked into every available space, plus lots of great tips on how to spin these fibers. This year, we've included a six-page Natural Fiber Directory in the issue—this is a special section that you can pull out and take with you for reference when you're shopping for natural fiber. As a bonus, we included enlarged versions of the charts for the Qiviut Shawlette by Sandi Wiseheart on the back of the directory (the charts are also included with the pattern in the magazine). The pattern for the half-gloves shown on the cover is included in the handspun gallery, along with six versions of the half-gloves showing just the tip-of-the-iceberg of what can be done with the pattern if you vary the fiber, color, and/or grist of the yarn you use. If you’re looking for a bit of color—look no further—the Spring 2011 issue of Spin-Off has some great ideas for how to blend the colors you already have into new and interesting combinations—the possibilities are infinite. Speaking of infinite possibilities, take a look at the Handspun Gallery of Helix Scarves and get your needles ready. Ready to sink your hands into some fleece? Try Wensleydale—their lustrous locks are seductive. All about the spinning wheel! Trace the history of the wheel to its possible origins by learning about Jonathan Bosworth’s reproduction of a Han Dynasty spinning wheel from a Chinese stone carving created 1,200 years before scholars believe the spinning wheel was invented. Visit to the Ashford Handicrafts spinning wheel factory in Ashburton, New Zealand, and learn how this business has thrived through two world wars and fire to provide the world with spinning wheels. Join the discussion with current custom wheels makers and where they see the craft headed.

Beyond these fascinating articles we have lots of tips to help you get to know your wheel better: Trouble shooting tips for beginners. When you’re just getting started spinning, the smallest thing (such as a yarn caught around an orifice hook) can stop you in your tracks. Learn what to look for when your spinning isn’t going the way you’d like. There are so many orifices available now for spinning wheels—innies, outties, deltas, o-rings, etc.—learn about how to best use them to get the yarns you want. Many spinners get started spinning because they have inherited an antique wheel or found one in an antique shop—but making that wheel work for you can be a challenge. We have an article will give you the resources you need to get it up and running.

In this issue, we’re looking at fiber close-up—really close-up—by examining crimp and diameter in detail to understand why fiber does what it does. Beth Smith has written a great article about spinning to the crimp—it’s a pretty straightforward concept and a wonderful place to start when you’re deciding how to spin your yarn. Deb Robson has written a really fascinating article about fiber diameter—she sent samples to a lab to look at the diameter of fiber from rare breeds of sheep (in addition to some that are not so rare). She walks us through the scans in a very logical way, explaining what the findings mean for spinners. And Judith MacKenzie examines the difference between hair and fiber with her wonderful ability to ask big questions and then answer them in lyrical ways.

Our fiber basic focus is on yaks. And our developing your skills department takes a look at purchasing and sorting a fleece. This issue also includes our largest ever special pull out Natural Fiber Directory full of suppliers and mills from across the United States and around the world.

from the top down

top-down had    top-down hat
top-down hat
With just one or two skeins of yarn, you can whip up a quick baby gift or fun headwarmer for any member of your family!

Personally, I love working hats from the top down toward the ears. The fussiness of juggling needles with so few stitches pays off quickly. Because you’re increasing to the right number of stitches for the recipient’s head, you can simply stop when it fits. (No more guessing how many stitches to cast on for a good fit!) Plus, earflaps are a breeze to position and work down off the sides, if you are so inclined.

Unpatterns® are ‘road maps’ to get you from cast on to finishing without having to rely on someone else’s stitch-by-stitch instructions. This Unpattern, like the others in the series, helps you put together a project the fun way: by falling in love with some yarn and creating a design uniquely your own. On the inside pages you will find a visual overview of the project, plus diagrams and step-by-step instructions to help you build your ideal head topper!

Do you want to knit a wee preemie hat? Or a wild, striped number for your teenage nephew? Or what about a cozy cashmere cap for your mother or best friend? Instructions for sizing and shaping hats of all sizes are in here.
The art of knitting socks has been around almost as long as feet, and for good reason! Socks are fun to knit, great portable projects, and an ideal gift for those you love.

This Unpattern® sock is cast on at the cuff, with a traditional K2,P2 rib down the entire cuff and along the top of the foot to ensure a custom fit for all kinds of feet. A simple short-row heel and a toe that doesn’t need grafting makes this an ideal starting place for novice sock knitters!

Unpattern socks are easy to make in your choice of yarn from fingering to worsted; the chart below helps you choose materials and determine the stitch count. Inside the Unpattern, instructions are laid out visually, with detailed blurbs for each phase of shaping. Once you are comfortable knitting socks, tips on the back page can help you refine the finished product.

Happy socks, happy feet!